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Patent reveals nextgen Google


. . . log processing system may track actions performed by each particular client with respect to that client’s history of accessing various web sites. In this case, the web site mapping storage may rank the web pages within a web site based on the particular client’s user history and the web site mapping information may be different for each particular client . . .

What? The foregoing is an excerpt from Google’s newly published patent application covering its site links technology. Filed June 20, 2005 and published December 21, 2006, Google’s US Patent Application No. 20060287985 covers Google’s method of providing you multiple search results from a single website. You know sometimes when you do a Google search and get some indented results from the same web address listed directly below a search result? That is a site link, a link to another page from the same website that may be relevant to your search query. The newly published patent application covers Google’s method of collecting and displaying site link search results along with their regular search results.

Why should you care? You have been seeing the indented site search results on Google for months. Well, the above language taken from the patent application suggests Google is working toward a something much more interesting – custom search results. The above patent application language indicates Google may be on the cusp of customizing its search engine results for each user. When I search for cookies, the nextgen search will give me results relating to a small text file located on my hard drive. When my mom searches for cookies on the nextgen system, she will get results for different chocolate chip cookie recipes.

The system will examine your previous searches, determine the results you clicked on, and “learn” what you are really trying to find. Sure, the generic Google will always be available for new users and the aluminum foil hat crowd, but the nextgen Google promises to cut a lot of the fat out of your search results.

Brett Trout

Posted in Patent Law. Tagged with , , , .